Archive for the month “Νοέμβριος, 2013”

The November 24 news roundup podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin (Consider These)

This week on the podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin:

– the ‘nuclear option’ to curtail the filibuster
– a bipartisan failure on mental illness treatment
– sequestration will only get worse in 2014
– the higher education deadlock in Greece
– Ukraine spurns Brussels, eyes Moscow ties
– the terms of the Iran-world powers nuclear deal

– holiday-fraud alert and the Catalan «caganers»
– the ‘Knockout Game’ and the cotton ball diet
– Dutch pragmatism, alcoholics and street cleaning
– bounty for escaped fish and a doorknob-less society
– small town election flub and the word of the year

Download and listen here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1KU27prGcwUQXhCWW52d0xYUDQ/edit

Ta Yp’Opsin (Consider These) weekly podcast (in Greek) with Chicago journalists Elena Spilioti and George Zorbas. News, interviews, commentary and great music!

Advertisements

The November 17 news roundup podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin (Consider These)

This week on the podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin:

– repairs, legislative attacks and political damage of the Affordable Care Act
– anniversaries: The Athens Polytechnic uprising and the JFK assassination
– new urban guerrilla group declares start of campaign against Golden Dawn
– the legacy of Glafcos Clerides and a testing week for the Greek government
– concessions, compromise and the future of a German governing coalition
– Iran’s “non-negotiable right” to enrich uranium defended and contested
– Assad gains ground, reinforces position, exploits fractious opposition
– bold set of economic and social reforms in China and a new era in Chile

– are greed and the insatiable desire for a good deal ruining Thanksgiving?
– medical tourism and the strange new front in the war over Obamacare
– financial incentives aim to boost a «stigmatized» practice in Britain
– ‘Museum of Words’, ‘bribery phrases’ and the «Black Pete» debate
– scandal of crack-smoking mayor puts media spotlight on Toronto
– 911 misuse: mean non-drinking neighbors and a snoring one-night stand

Download and listen here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1KU27prGcwUVDVRTFJZalRNQU0/edit

Ta Yp’Opsin (Consider These) weekly podcast (in Greek) with Chicago journalists Elena Spilioti and George Zorbas. News, interviews, commentary and great music!

The November 10 news roundup podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin (Consider These)

This week on the podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin:

– the winners, losers and lessons from off-year elections
– U.S. on track to become a toothless UNESCO member
– SYRIZA’s meaningless motion of no confidence
– troika inspectors focus on potentially explosive issues
– deflations and inflation concerns in the eurozone
– divided Syrian opposition unites against Moscow talks
– is an Iran-West nuclear deal feasible under Rouhani?
– Bo Xilai «chairman for life» in new political party

– Election day winds of change and a Messianic G. W. Bush
– the insensitivity of “Kristall Nacht” for spa-lovers
– graphic designers, the Army of Islam wants you
– the grievance and drama of Ex-Belgian king Albert II
– the First Amendment tangled up with women’s skirts
– class-based guilt relieves restroom attendants of their duties
– an «extremely ugly baby girl», a lawsuit and an epic secret
– cockroaches backpacks «teach kids to be psychopaths»
– snake massage sensations and ‘pensions’ for police dogs

Download and listen here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1KU27prGcwUNFdTWHFHMDBnVW8/edit?usp=drive_web

Ta Yp’Opsin (Consider These) weekly podcast (in Greek) with Chicago journalists Elena Spilioti and George Zorbas. News, interviews, commentary and great music!

“Like” our Ta Yp’Opsin (Consider These) Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/taypopsin

The November 3 news roundup podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin (Consider These)

This week on the podcast Ta Yp’ Opsin:

– the murder and chaos at LAX by a lone shooter
– a bitter tea taste in two gubernatorial elections
– committee tightens eavesdropping, allows room to grow
– calls for calm, fears of revenge after GD members shooting
– the «Davos of the Muslim world» and violent Kosovo election
– John Kerry tours to ease tensions and soothe worries
– the obstacle course to the uncertain Geneva 2 Syrian talks
– the latest Israeli move to sabotage peace talks

– a bitter debate about future of Iraqi Jewish belongings
– the debate over Banksy’s month of art in NY
– a third gender and a Chavez apparition
– risque themes of Bollywood anger some Pakistanis
– ‘Lady Tarzan’ and protests against ‘Eating Rudolph’
– Hallmark takes the fun out of “gay apparel”
– Britney Spears’ hits perfect way of fighting pirates
– the direction of a wagging tail and a wine shortage alert

Download and listen here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1KU27prGcwURFQtUHZYX3ZXSmM/edit?usp=drive_web

Ta Yp’Opsin (Consider These) weekly podcast (in Greek) with Chicago journalists Elena Spilioti and George Zorbas. News, interviews, commentary and great music!

A Look at Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood

CAIRO (AP) – Egypt’s first freely elected president, Mohammed Morsi, appeared in court Monday on charges of inciting murder during December clashes at the presidential palace in Cairo. The trial is part of a wide-scale crackdown on his Muslim Brotherhood by the military-backed government after the nation’s top general removed Morsi on July 3 following nationwide protests.Here is a look at some of key history of the Muslim Brotherhood group:- The Muslim Brotherhood group was founded in 1928 by a school teacher-turned-Islamic ideologue Hassan al-Banna in the Suez Canal city of Ismailia. He advocated spreading Islam by from raising up a «Muslim individual, then a Muslim family, then a Muslim society» based on Islamic teachings to pave the way for the establishment of a worldwide Islamic state that knows no borders.- Its motto is «Islam is the solution» and its emblem has two crossed swords above a Quran on a green field.- The Brotherhood has a strong hierarchical structure, starting with the top leader – called the «general guide,» whom members vow to «hear and obey»- down through regional administrators to the base of small «families» made up of small numbers of members. The General Guidance Bureau serves as its main executive body, and a body known as the Shura Council serves as a form of general assembly.- It also runs a large network of charities, hospitals and social services that help build its grass-roots support. Businesses owned by Brotherhood members help finance the movement.- While based in Egypt, the Brotherhood has branches in dozens of countries, including the Palestinian militant group Hamas, now ruling the Gaza Strip. Its Tunisian arm dominated elections there after the 2011 ouster of autocrat Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.- The Brotherhood in its early years had an armed wing, the «Special Organization,» to fight British colonialists and Israelis. It was implicated in assassination of Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud Fahmi al-Nokrashi in 1948 after he outlawed the group. Two months later, al-Banna was assassinated in Cairo.- After Egypt’s 1952 military coup, the Brotherhood was accused of an assassination attempt against President Gamal Abdel-Nasser. Authorities responded by executing prominent Brotherhood ideologue Sayyed Qutb and imprisoning thousands of other members in what the group calls its «first agony.»- After nearly a decade in prison and exile, the group witnessed a revival in the 1970s under then-President Anwar Sadat, who tolerated the Brotherhood and used it as a counterweight to leftist opponents. The group formally foreswore violence. Youth groups became a pool for new cadres. After the 1979 peace accords with Israel, Sadat was assassinated by Islamic militants, many influenced by Qutb’s hard-line teachings.- Under the nearly 30-year rule of autocrat Hosni Mubarak, the Brotherhood saw various phases of toleration and repression. It struck deals to enjoy a margin of freedom that allowed it to create its networks. But when authorities felt it had gone too far, they would launch crackdowns, arresting members and trying leaders before military courts. Though still outlawed, the Brotherhood became the country’s strongest opposition political group, running candidates in elections as independents, and winning a fifth of parliament’s seats in 2005.- After Mubarak’s ouster in 2011, the Brotherhood formed a political party for the first time, the Freedom and Justice Party. It emerged the biggest winner in parliament election, using its grass-root network to bring out voters. It took almost half the lower house’s seats, while other Islamists took another quarter of the seats, and together they held nearly all the seats in the upper house. After Morsi’s election victory with just under 52 percent of the vote, Brotherhood members dominated his government and other posts. Critics accused the Brotherhood’s leadership of being the true decision-makers for Morsi, a claim his administration denied.

Post Navigation